First Aid Kits and Tips : Treating Poison Ivy & Oak Rash: First Aid for Minor Injuries

Hi! I am Tracey Cullers on behalf of expertvillage.com.
In this segment, I’ll show you how to take care of poison ivy or poison oak. This case
developed over several hours ago and now is blistering and sore. First, you want to put
gloves on so that you do not get any oils on your hands and you do not spread it around.
If the oils spread, they can get in onto your hands, your eyes and cause intense suffering.
Put gloves on and then prepare to cleanse the area. There are products out there, that
are cleansing towelettes you can carry around with you. These are specially designed for
poison ivy, or poison oak. You go ahead and apply these to dry skin, rubbing them in for
several minutes. You follow that with a cleansing of water and then you repeat the process.
You really need to get those oils off of the area. If you don’t have this type of a product
you can use a castle soap towelette or any type of cleansing towelette that has soap
in it or use soap and water at a fountain. You can use these other types of products
if you don’t have that. I would also recommend that you use Benadryl or some sort of antihistamine
to reduce the swelling and the pain. Another type of ointment that you can use is calamine.

19 comments

  1. I've never had Poison oak until now… It's been 3 weeks now, just two areas in my lower leg. it is not bubbling like girl in the video. just red, tiny little bumps. My question is for those who've had it before, at what point do i say "i need to go to the doctor" – at this point i don't feel anything serious, the itch is not unbearable. Although i feel fine, i want to make sure that there isn't something else that i need to keep an eye out for.read stuff online, but experiences are better. thx

  2. You sound like robots. Try speaking from your brain, not like you memorized a script. I don't see why your making these vids if it's not firsthand common knowledge to you as is, and should be easy to just simply talk about….

    Good info but uhhh…. yeah, just be yourself come on i would have liked it 100x more and maybe taken it serious

  3. oh and I'm pretty sure poison ivy isn't that deathly looking … i mean maybe in rare cases but that looked like a 3rd degree burn that was bit by a rattle snake and then rubbed in nettles

  4. @avatar098 i bet she put it there on purpose..i highly doubt she would just get poinson ivy in one secluded area of her body by accident..

  5. @maldek5 actually, if you google 'skin rash hall of fame' and click on the very first link, you will see posion ivy rashes that make the one in this video look like a little bug bite.

  6. Soap & water DOES NOT remove Poison Ivy oil!! It spreads it! REcommending this "If however you do not have the other towelettes" can cause serious pain & suffering=not wise LADIES!!! I am speaking from experience-Tecnu Ivy works to cut the oil- but you MUST not touch the effected areas if at all possible until the body works itself through the healing process because it can continue to spread once the skin is broken!!!

  7. Why does Expert Village keep getting these people that think they are experts to come out in videos. Why don't they try and actually research find a REAL expert. I don't need a lady that walks dogs in parks to claim they are "EXPERTS". COME ON GET YOUR ACTS TOGETHER!

  8. What the hell is this bullshit?? That's not poison ivy, and certainly not after a couple of hours of exposure. I've gotten poison ivy tons of times, and this is not poison ivy. That's bubble gum on her arm lol And she certainly wouldn't be smiling if she did get it. Poison ivy sucks to high hell, and takes days to get rid of. You need Tecnu extreme poison ivy scrub, anti-itch spray, calamine lotion, and bandages. You need to pop any blisters in the shower, scrub it down with tecnu oil wash, and then cover it in calamine lotion and anti itch spray, then bandage it tight. Suffocating itis the key factor. The more you let poison ivy breathe the more it will spread. It also thrives on heat and sunlight, so keeping the area bandaged is essential, and also prevents the popped blisters from spreading further and getting infected. Im super sensitive to poison ivy, and I can get rid of it in usually a week, it takes time, and patience to withstand the intense itching. Believe me you won't get rid of it overnight.

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