I’m a Mormon, Physician, and Immigrant Son

I’m a fourth-year medical
student. I’m currently waiting to hear
where I’m going for my residency. Kind of an exciting time;
kind of the end of the road, end of a long slog
with my wife. And we’re excited to finally be
on this end of it. She might deny this. She
crashed my sister’s wedding because I asked her to
dance twice and she said no. I didn’t have the salsa moves
yet, so, you know? I’m very old-school. Lots of times when I start
to feel bad for myself, I think of my parents and my
grandparents, my dad working 24-hour
shifts in a bakery. My job is stressful, and it can
be tiring, but it’s not hard. There were two areas I did
not want to do at first. One of those was OB/GYN;
I said, “Absolutely not.” But once I started, I found
I really enjoyed the work. Hearing a baby’s heartbeat,
for many parents, that’s the moment of like,
“This is for real. There’s a heartbeat inside me
that’s not my own.” Life is a miracle. Women form the lifeblood
of our communities. They’re the ones that take
care of the children, the ones that send their
husbands to the doctor’s office, the ones that watch out
for their families. That’s my goal as a physician,
is for a healthy community, and I figure that was the
best way to do it. It’s a girl. What are you
going to name her? I’d already seen lots of births
when my wife went into labor. All of a sudden you’re not
on the doctor’s side; you’re not thinking science
and objective data. You’re thinking, “My wife is
in real pain!” But after it was all over, there
was no more important moment in my life than the moment
I first held my son. You get to hold him, and
you’re like, “Man, this is really the beginning of my
family.” Then you realize everyone
has that same feeling. No matter how many times
you do it, it’s always special. My parents came from
Latin America, a place where people die
from malaria and diarrhea. To come to the U.S., they
sill had to kind of tough out health problems
because they didn’t have care. One thing I plan to do with
my career is really help those who have no
other options. I’m grateful to be the option
for people who have many, but I’m more interested in
those who have none. Faith is not philosophy; it’s something that should
help your life. If you’re going to have faith,
you have to serve others. And that’s what draws me
to medicine— the ability to change
someone’s life. I’m a fourth-year med student.
I’m a future doctor. I’m a husband.
I’m a father. My name is Javier Chavez,
and I’m a Mormon.

20 comments

  1. That's awesome man! It's nice to see a doctor talking about service and being involved with healthcare like that. Really inspiring!

  2. @AirCanada04 we just want you to feel the way we feel and see how great life really is, just seeing all of life's miracles due to living the gospel is just amazing and wonderful

  3. @AirCanada04 they don't LOL.This is to show that mormons re just as normal and not some overly modest home schooled weirdoes

  4. When I was a kid, I would tell people I was a mormon and people's eyes would bug out. They couldn't believe it because I was smart and different and myself. As if mormons were some sort of cookie cutter versions of each other. Being mormon often means being seen in a poor light. Many simply do not understand who we are. I love these videos because it shows us as people who's faith is intrinsic to who we are in our daily regular lives.

  5. BY WATCHING THESE VIDEOS I REALISED THAT MORMONS ARE GOOD BELIEVERS OF JESUS CHRIST, BUT IN INDIA WE THOUGHT THAT MORMONS ARE AGAINST CHRIST BUT AFTER WATCHING THESE VIDEOS THATS NOT

  6. The great thing about these people are that they aren't asking you to become a Mormon – they are describing themselves as normal people, just like us, and want to let us know that they aren't ALL creeps. A lot are actually great, polite, kind people. The videos are just asking for our acceptance and understanding of their religion. You don't have to become apart of it, just don't bash it when don't know anything about the Mormon community. 🙂 xx

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