Mid-American Gardener – August 8, 2019

[MUSIC] >> GOOD EVENING AND WELCOME. MY NAME IS TINISHA SHADE-SPAIN, I’M YOUR HOED FOR MID AMERICAN GARDNER, THANK YOU FOR JOINING US TONIGHT. WE HAVE A SUPER SHOW LINED UP FOR YOU THIS EVENING. WE’VE GOT A GRAND NEW SET, GREAT GUESTS. SO MUCH TO GET TO TONIGHT. WE WOULD LOVE TO HAVE YOUR PHONE CALLS ALSO A LITTLE LATER INTO THE SHOW. SO AS I MENTIONED, WE’VE GOT A LOT TO GET TO. LET’S HAVE OUR PANELISTS INTRODUCE THEMSELVES AND TELL YOU A LITTLE BIT MORE ABOUT THEIR SPECIALTY AND WE’LL GO FROM THERE. JEN, WE’LL START WITH YOU. >> JENNIFER NELSON: I’M JENNIFER NELSON, I WRITE A BLOG CALLED GROUNDED AND GROWING. MY FAVORITE QUESTIONS ARE GENERAL HORTICULTURE AND HOUSE PLANTS AND VEGETABLES. >> SUE? >> I’M PHIL NIXON, AN EXTENSION ENTOMOLOGIST WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. I COVER INSECT CAN HE QUESTIONS. IF YOU GOT SOMETHING BUGGING YOU, I CAN HELP OUT. [LAUGHING] >> >> KAY CARNES: I’M. >> KAY CARNES: MASTER GARDENER, I LIKE TO ANSWER QUESTIONS ABOUT VEGETABLES AND PERENNIALS, SOME PERENNIALS AND ANNUALS. >> WONDERFUL. >> ALL KINDS OF THINGS. >> WE’VE GOT A GREAT PANELIST GROUP HERE TO ANSWER ALL THE QUESTIONS YOU HAVE AGOT AND ALSO TAKE A LOOK AT THE BEAUTIFUL NEW SET. I THINK THIS IS THE FIRST TIME YOU’RE SEEING IT. SHOUT OUT TO THE CREW. THEY DID A FANTASTIC JOB, D.J. AND THE GANG PUTTING THIS TOGETHER. IT LOOKS REALLY BEAUTIFUL. SO THANKS FOR THAT. SHOW AND TELL. JEN, WE’LL START WITH YOU. EVERYBODY BROUGHT IN A FEW THINGS. WHAT’S YOUR FIRST THING? >> THIS UNHAPPY LOOKING SPECIMEN. I SWEAR I CUT IT AND PUT IT IN WATER AND IT DOES NOT LIKE IT. THIS PROBABLY A LOT OF OUR VIEWERS WILL FIND THIS IN THEIR BACK YARD, THIS HAPPENS TO BE AN ORNAMENTAL PEAR GONE WILD. ONE OF THE PROBLEMS WITH ORNAMENTAL PEAR LIKE THE CLEVELAND OR BRADFORD PEAR, THEY OUT CROSS EACH OTHER AND PRODUCE THESE WILD TYPE SEEDLINGS THAT HAVE NASTY THORNS. I DON’T KNOW IF YOU CAN GET THAT. >> WE CAN SEE THEM. >> IT’S HORRIBLE. THEY’RE EVERYWHERE. THE VERY FIRST THING IN THE SPRING WE SEE BLOOMING, THAT’S WHITE FLOWER, A LOT IN THE CLOVER LEAFS ON THE HIGHWAY, IT IS ORNAMENTAL PEAR. BECOMING A PROBLEM IN OUR WOODLANDS AND SO THEY NEED TO REALLY NOT BE PLANTED IN LANDSCAPES ANYMORE. I SEE SOME OF THIS GROWING IN MY YARD UNDER A VIBERNAM BUSH. IT’S GOTTEN NASTY. >> SOMEONE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MAYBE HAS ONE? >> OH, YEAH. WE HAVE SEVERAL NEIGHBORS WITH THEM. WE USE TODAY HAVE QUITE A FEW OF THEM PLANTED DOWN THE BOULEVARD IN OUR NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY’RE ALSO TEND TO BE REALLY SUSCEPTIBLE TO FIRE FLIGHT. THAT TOOK ALL OF THEM OUT IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD, 19 OF THEM AT ONE TIME. AND THIS WAS OKAY WITH ME. THEY’RE IN MY YARD AND A FRIEND POINTED IT OUT THAT WE HAD QUITE A FEW SEEDLINGS. SOMEHOW GOT REALLY BIG. [LAUGHING] >> NICE. AND SO IF YOU COME ACROSS THESE AND YOU DON’T WANT THEM, WHAT’S SOME ADVICE FOR FOLKS? >> REMOVE THEM. PULL THEM OUT IF YOU FIND THEM SMALL. BIGGER YOU MIGHT HAVE TO USE SOME HERBICIDE TO CUT IT BACK AND PUT IT ON THE STUMP. >> THANK YOU. >> IF THEY’RE REALLY TINY MOWERS WORK GREAT ON THEM. >> NO FUSS, NO MUSS. RIGHT? [LAUGHING] >> THAT’S IT. >> NEXT WEEK GET BACK — EVENTUALLY GIVES IT UP >> WE’LL COME BACK TO YOU JEN. I KNOW YOU HAVE ANOTHER SHOW AND TELL. PHIL, WE’RE MOVING TO YOU. YOU HAVE AN EMAIL QUESTION ABOUT JAPANESE BEETLES? IS. >> YES. >> WOULD YOU LIKE ME TO READ IT OR WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ IT? >> I’LL READ IT. GIVE YOU A BREAK. >> THANKS. >> TERRY IT SAYS IS DUSTING WITH DIATOMATIOUS EARTH USED TO BE CONTROL THE JAPANESE BEE TELLS, IF YOU’RE NOT FAMILIAR WITH JAPANESE BEETLE, LIVING IN A CAVE OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THE DAMAGE IS SUCH THAT THEY WILL COME ONTO THE LEAVES AND WILL FEED AT THE TOP OF THE TREE FIRST. THIS IS ONE OF THE FEW INSECTS THAT LIKES TO FEED ON THE UPPER SIDE OF THE LEAF. THEY GO PARTWAY THROUGH AND TURN BROWN AND SO ON. THEY HIT ANYTHING IN THE ROSE FAMILY. SO — AND ALSO LIKE LINDENS, WHICH IS WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING AT HERE, THEY LIKE THE ROSE FAMILY, THEIR FRUIT TREES, APPLES, PEACHES, PEARS, PLUMBS, ROSES, ALL THESE SORTS OF THINGS. >> NOW YOU’RE JUST SHOWING OFF. >> YEAH, YOU KNOW. I SAID THAT A FEW TIMES IN MY LIFE. [LAUGHING] >> AND THE BEETLES THEMSELVES ARE SMALL, THEY ARE A… AN 8TH OF AN INCH TO — YOU CAN ACTUALLY SEE THEM. AND THE COCKROACH — THERE WE GO. AT ANY RATE, THEY ARE ABOUT 3/8TH TO HALF AN INCH LONG. AND THEY ARE — THEY’RE GOING TO BE — THEY’RE GOING TO HAVE — THEY’RE METALLIC GREEN IN COLOR AND COPPERY WING COLORS ON THE BACK. REALLY PRETTY BEETLES BUT ANYTHING CAN BE TOO MUCH. QUESTION IS, WITH THE DIATOMATIOU EARTHWORK? WELL, NO YOU IF DUST THEM WITH IT, YES. BUT IF IT APPLY IT TO THE PLANT, IT’S PROBABLY NOT GOING TO BE ENOUGH. THE DIATOMATIOUS EARTH IS MINED, MADE UP OF SINGLE CELLED SILICATIOUS ANIMALS AND ESSENTIALLY THEY’VE GOT SILICA IN THEM, THEY’RE LIKE WAX. AND THEY WILL SCRAPE AWAY THE OUTSIDE OF THE COVER, THEY WALK THROUGH IT AND GET IT INTO THEIR JOINTS AND THAT ALL WORKS AND MAKES HOLES AND ALL THAT SORT OF STUFF AND THEY BLEED TO DEATH EVENTUALLY OR DRY OUT DUE TO THE WAXY AREAS BEING TAKEN AWAY. AND THAT WILL — THAT MAY WORK A LITTLE BIT DOWN IN THE TURF WHERE THEY WILL LAY THEIR EGGS AND YOU’LL GET WHITE GRUBS, BUT PROBABLY NOT VERY WELL. IT ALSO DOESN’T WORK WELL IF IT GETS RAINED ON. AND UNTIL IT DRIES OUT AGAIN. IT HAS TO BE DRY AND DUSTY IN ORDER FOR IT TO WORK. IS IT SAFE FOR BEES? IT KILLS EVERY KIND OF INSECT. EVERY KIND OF INSECT. BEES, BUTTERFLIES, EVERYTHING. OKAY? SO IT IS NO SELECTIVITY WHATSOEVER. AS LONG AS IT’S IN A DRY SITUATION. SO YEAH, YOU DON’T PUT IT OUT THERE PROBABLY VERY GOOD. A — PROBABLY THE MOST — BEST ORGANIC THING IS YOU CAN HAND PICK THEM AFTER 3:00 IN THE AFTERNOON AND IF YOU BOTHER THEM THEY’LL DROP DOWN AND GO INTO A BUCKET OR A JAR WITH SOAPY WATER IN IT. YOU CAN — YOU CAN — YOU CAN SPRAY THEM WITH ANY PIRETHROID INSECTICIDE. CAR BOR — INSECTICIDE WORKS AS WELL. OUT FROM JULY TO THE MIDDLE OF AUGUST. PRETTY WELL RUN THROUGH THE SUMMER. DIATOMATIOUS EARTH IS SOMETHING THAT WOULD WORK THEORETICALLY. BUT IN PRACTICALITY, NO. >> KAY, YOU’VE GOT TOMATOES >> I BROUGHT A COUPLE OF HEIRLOOM TOMATOES, THIS ONE IS A VERY PALE YELLOW AND CALLED A WHITE TOMATO. AND THIS ONE IS CALLED WHITE QUEEN. THEY’RE KIND OF MILD TASTING, BUT THEY’RE QUITE GOOD. AND OFTEN TIMES THEY’LL GET A LITTLE PINK BLUSH ON THE BOTTOM WHEN THEY’RE REALLY RIPE LIKE THIS. WE KIND OF LIKE THOSE. THIS ONE THOUGH IS THE STAR OF THE SHOW THIS YEAR FOR ME. IT’S A NEW ONE. IT’S A RUSSIAN TOMATO. AND I’M GOING TO TRY TO PRONOUNCE THIS. IT’S CALLED BLAKATODAYA SHOTALUKA. >> THAT’S A MOUTHFUL. >> I’M GOING TO CUT IT OPEN BECAUSE THE INSIDE IS WHAT YOU REALLY WANT TO SEE. IT’S GREEN AND IT’S RED. AND IT IS VERY SWEET. >> OKAY. >> AND THE PACKET SAID THEY WERE MEDIUM SIZE TOMATOES, BUT THIS ONE’S ACTUALLY A SMALL ONE. I PICKED ONE THAT WAS A POUND AND 12 OUNCES. >> WOW. >> SO I WOULD KIND OF CALL THEM LARGE. [LAUGHING] >> I’D SAY SO. >> BUT IT REALLY IS A DELICIOUS TOMATO. AND I’VE GROWN OTHER GREEN TOMATOES. AND SOMETIMES THEY’RE KIND OF A LITTLE BIT TART. THEY’RE NOT AS SWEET AS SOME OF THE OTHERS. BUT THIS ONE IS EXTREMELY SWEET. >> YOU SAID YOU’VE BEEN DOING A LOT OF CANNING LATELY >> I HAVE >> WHAT OTHER VARIETIES — WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE ONE THAT YOU’VE GROWN THIS YEAR OTHER THAN THIS ONE? >> UHM, WELL, I’VE GOT A — IT’S A LONG RED TASTE TOMATO CALLED BLUE BEACH. AND THAT’S A VERY GOOD TOMATO. ONE OF MY FAVORITE TOMATOES I GREW LAST YEAR AND BROUGHT THEM TO THE SHOW, IT’S A LITTLE OBLONG — LIKE A CHERRY TOMATO. >> A DARK ONE? WAS THAT DARK IN COLOR? >> IT’S GREEN AND — >> OKAY. >> — BLACK. IT’S CALLED BRADAZOTOMIC GRAY. AND THEY ARE OUTSTANDING. >> FOR ALL THE SHOWS — >> THERE YOU GO. >> WE COULD GO ALL DAY WITH THAT ONE. >> TOMATO GROWERS. [LAUGHING] >> AND I ALWAYS GROW ABOUT 10 DIFFERENT VARIETIES. SO… KIND OF A LOT. >> THANK YOU VERY MUCH. WE DO HAVE SOME CALLS ON THE LINE. TO LET YOU KNOW THE NUMBER, IF YOU WERE INTERESTED IN CALLING, IT’S 333-3495. WE ARE TAKING CALLS, WE’RE GOING TO GO TO LINE 1, INDY IN URBANA WITH A QUESTION ABOUT A ROSE BUSH. ARE YOU THERE? >> YES, I AM >> GO AHEAD. >> I HAVE A ROSE BUSH IN MY YARD THAT MY DAUGHTER BOUGHT FOR ME PROBABLY 25 OR MORE YEARS AGO. AT KMART. SO PROBABLY NOT A GREAT BUSH. ANYWAY, IT — SO I MOVED IT INTO A SUNNIER SPOT. IT BLOOMED PRETTY WELL. THEN NOT SO WELL. THEN MY NEIGHBOR, WHO KNOWS A LOT ABOUT PLANTS, LAST MARCH CUT IT WAY, WAY BACK. NOW THIS SUMMER WE HAVE LOTS OF FOLIAGE AND NO BLOOMS. THAT’S MY QUESTION. WHAT SHOULD I DO ABOUT IT? >> FOLIAGE AND NO BLOOMS AFTER A BIG CUT-BACK. >> CORRECT. >> WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS? >> IS IT POSSIBLE THAT THE TOP DIED? A LOT OF TIMES YOU HAVE A GRAFTED ROSE BUSH AND WITH THE HARD WINTER YOU MAY HAVE HAD SOME DIE-BACK OF THE PART YOU REALLY WANT. AND WHAT YOU’RE SEEING IS ROOT STOCK. >> SO WITH THAT — HOW WOULD THAT PRESENT? HOW WOULD SHE KNOW? >> GENERALLY WHERE THE GRAFT IS, THERE’S KIND OF AN ENLARGED AREA. THAT KIND OF LOOKS LIKE A KNOT. AND SO IF IT’S COMING FROM BELOW THAT, THAT WOULD BE FROM THE ROOT STOCK. >> HOW CLOSE TO THE GROUND DID YOU CUT IT BACK? >> WELL, SHE CUT IT BACK WAY CLOSE TO THE — CLOSER THAN I WOULD HAVE. NOT ALL THE WAY DOWN. MAYBE 6 INCHES. >> OKAY. BECAUSE USUALLY THE GRAFT IS 2 OR 3 INCHES ABOVE THE SOIL LINE. >> I CAN STILL LOOK, THOUGH. I’LL LOOK FOR THAT. >> EVEN IF THEY DIDN’T CUT ALL THE WAY DOWN BEFORE THE GRAFT, I THINK JENNIFER’S RIGHT ON IT. BECAUSE IT WOULD HAVE — IT WOULD HAVE BEEN — MAY HAVE GOT IT DOWN BELOW WHERE IT COULD SPROUT OUT OR IT COULD BE AS YOU MENTIONED, WITH THE VERY COLD WEATHER, IT MAY HAVE KILLED OFF EVERYTHING BUT THE ROOT STOCK. EITHER WAY IT WOULD END UP WITH WHAT YOU’VE GOT, PROBABLY. >> IS THERE ANY SAVING THIS? OR SHOULD SHE RIP IT OUT AND GRAB A NEW ONE? WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS? >> YOU CAN ALWAYS GIVE IT ANOTHER YEAR. >> YEAH. >> SEE WHAT HAPPENS. >> YEAH. A GARDENER ALWAYS GIVES IT ANOTHER YEAR. GIVE IT ANOTHER CHANCE. >> MOVE IT SOMEWHERE ELSE IN THE YARD IF YOU CAN’T STAND LOOKING AT IT. [LAUGHING] >> GIVE IT ONE MORE YEAR. >> WE’RE GOING TO GO WITH THAT. >> WAYNE — >> IN A LOUD VOICE. >> QUESTION ABOUT GRAPES AND AS ASPERAGUS. >> I HAVE CONCORD GRAPES THAT I PLANTED FIVE YEARS AGO AND EVERY YEAR THEY COME AND THEY START GETTING GREEN AND LITTLE SPOTS ON THEM AND THEN THEY START TO RIPEN AND JUST FALL OFF. >> ARE THE — ARE THE LEAVES HAVE SOME CURL ON THE EDGES AS WELL? OR DO THEY HAVE A TENDENCY TO BE VERY SMALL LEAVES? >> NO. PRETTY BIG LEAVES. BUT THEY START GETTING BROWN AROUND THE EDGES. >> DO ANY OF THE — ANY OF THE GRAPES RIPEN AT ALL? >> YEAH, THEY — THEY RIPEN. BUT THEN I GO OUT THERE ONE DAY, THEY’RE RIPE AND THEN THEY FALL OFF. >> OKAY. IF YOU’VE BEEN — IT’S PROBABLY — MAYBE HERBICIDE DAMAGE. 24 D DAMAGE, WHICH IS A COMMONLY USED HERBICIDE ASSOCIATED WITH LAWN CARE. WILL — WILL CAUSE THE GRAPES IN A BUNCH TO RIPEN UNEVENLY. YOU’LL GET — THEY’LL GET THE FIRST ONES TO RIPEN AND THEN THE REST WILL BE GREEN AND THEN SOME MORE WILL RIPEN AND THEY’LL — THE OTHERS WILL FALL OFF. SEEMS LIKE YOURS ARE FALLING OFF A LITTLE EARLIER THAN I WOULD EXPECT WITH 24 D. BUT THAT CAN BE A SITUATION. SOMEONE WORKED ON IT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS INDICATED IF YOU HAVE A — THE RIGHT WEATHER CONDITIONS AND THE RIGHT INVERSION AND THINGS OF THIS NATURE, YOU CAN HAVE 24 D SPRAYED WITHIN 10 MILES OF YOU AND HAVE THIS HAPPEN TO GRAPES. SO DON’T LOOK AT YOUR NEIGHBOR. YOUR NEIGHBOR MAY BE WAY DOWN THE ROAD. OR IN THE NEXT TOWN. [LAUGHING] >> THAT’S — I’M SURROUNDED BY FARMERS. >> WELL, THEY — THE FARMERS NOW WITH THE — WITH THE ROUNDUP READY AND OTHER SORTS OF THINGS ARE NOT USING THE 24 D, THEY’RE — LIKE THEY USED TO. SO IT COULD BE FROM THAT. BUT IT’S MORE LIKELY COULD BE FROM ANYTHING ELSE. THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, COULD BE LOTS OF DIFFERENT PEOPLE THAT WOULD — MIGHT BE USING — USING THAT. AND IT MAY BE SOMETHING TOTALLY DIFFERENT. BUT IT SOUNDS SUSPICIOUSLY LIKE IT COULD BE THAT. >> OKAY. AND YOU HAD ANOTHER QUESTION ABOUT ASPERAGUS. >> YEAH. CAN YOU USE THAT — CALLED PREEN? SUPPOSED TO KEEP WEEDS DOWN? IS THAT SAFE FOR ASPERAGUS? PEOPLE USED TO USE ROCK SALT BUT SAY THAT DAMAGES IT. >> ROCK SALT RUINS YOUR SOIL. NOTHING ABOUT — [LAUGHING] >> DON’T USE THAT. >> UNANIMOUSLY. [LAUGHING] >> I DON’T KNOW IF PREENIS LABELED FOR ASPERAGUS. DOES ANYONE KNOW? >> I THINK IT IS. I HAVE HEARD IT RECOMMENDED BY PEOPLE. I WOULD TRUST THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS ON. THE PREEN, IS A PREEMERGENT HERB SITE. KEEPS THINGS FROM COMING UP AND YOUR ASPERAGUS WILL BE UP BY THE TIME YOU APPLY IT. WOULDN’T BE IN EFFECT THERE. >> SECOND ROUND OF SHOW AND TELL. WANTED TO GIVE YOU THE NUMBER TO CALL IN, 333-3495 IF YOU WOULD LIKE THE EXPERTS TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION. JEN, WHAT’S YOUR SECOND ITEM? >> I BROUGHT A HOUSE PLANT. ONE OF MY FAVORITE HOUSE PLANTS. THIS IS CALLED HOYA. ALSO CALLED WAX PLANT OR PORCELAIN PLANT. I NEVER HEARD THAT NAME BEFORE, BUT SOMEBODY HAD A QUESTION ON IT TO ME THIS WEEK AND CALLED IT THAT. IT’S A REALLY INDESTRUCTIBLE PLANT. HARD TO KILL IT. THIS ONE I HAD FOR SEVERAL YEARS AND THEY DO FLOWER. AND I WAS REALLY SURPRISED TO FIND FLOWERS ON IT A FEW WEEKS AGO. THIS IS PARTLY WHERE IT GETS ITS NAME. THE FLOWERS LOOK LIKE THEY’RE SCULPTED OUT OF WAX OR PORCELAIN. THIS ONE IS STARTING TO FADE. IT SMELLS EXACTLY LIKE CHOCOLATE. WHICH IS REALLY COOL. ONE OF THE THINGS ABOUT HOYA, THEY CAN TAKE YEARS TO FLOWER AND THEY HAVE TO GET FAIRLY LONG. YOU START GETTING THESE REALLY THIN-LOOKING SPROUTS THAT LOOK LIKE MAYBE THEY’VE NOT HAD ENOUGH LIGHT. THAT TENDS TO MEAN IT’S GETTING READY TO FLOWER. I HAD ONE WHERE I KEPT CUTTING THESE OFF. [LAUGHING] >> AND REALLY — MY HOUSE PLANT GAME, AND I REALIZED I WAS REMOVING ALL OPTIONS TO FLOWER. BUT THIS IS ALSO A GOOD EXAMPLE OF — THIS HAS NOT DONE REALLY ANYTHING FOR ME. AND I’VE HAD IT INDOORS FOR SEVERAL YEARS. THIS IS THE ONLY SECOND SUMMER I PUT IT OUTSIDE. AND PUTTING IT OUTSIDE SEEMS TO BE JUST — THESE ARE TROPICAL PLANTS, SO HEY, ALL THE HOT, HUMID WEATHER, THEY REALLY LIKE IT. SOMETIMES YOU GET TRIGGERS FOR THINGS LIKE FLOWERS THAT YOU DIDN’T EXPECT TO SEE. THE OTHER HOYA I HAVE ONLY FLOWERS IN FEBRUARY. I DIDN’T EXPECT TO SEE ONE FLOWERING IN THE MIDDLE OF SUMMER. THERE IT IS. >> IS THAT SUPPOSED TO BE — HAVE TWO COLORS ON TO IT OR IS THAT SUNBURN IN THE CENTER OF THE LEAVES? >> THIS IS A VAR GAITED. THIS IS SUPPOSED TO — >> YOU GET TOO MUCH LIGHT, IT WILL — IN THAT SAME AREA >> THIS IS ANOTHER ONE THAT I HAVE. THE SAME SPECIES BUT THE LEAVES ARE ALL CONTORTED AND IT’S CALLED HINDU ROPE. THAT’S THE ONE THAT FLOWERED IN THE WINTER. >> PRETTY >> PRETTY SLOW GROWING TOO. >> PRETTY MUCH ANY FLOWER CENTER WILL HAVE THEM. >> AND THAT YOU WERE CUTTING THEM OFF >> EVERYBODY MAKES MISTAKES. >> WHERE ARE THE EXPERTS? >> I WAS READING AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOYA, AND I READ MY RESEARCH, AND LIKE, OH, THAER WHAT THAT WAS. >> PHIL, WE’RE GOING TO YOU. WE’VE GOT ANOTHER QUESTION. >> JEREMY FROM GIBSON CITY. SAYS THIS IS A NEARBY BIRCH TREE. I HAVE INCLUDED THREE PICTURES AND I WONDER IF IT IS SOMETHING THAT WILL EASILY SPREAD INTO MY ARBOR VITAE. PLEASE ADVISE IF THERE IS PREVENTIVE CARRY SHOULD TAKE. I HAVE USED 7. AND JANICE FROM GIBSON CITY. SO WHAT YOU’VE GOT IS — THIS WAS KIND OF IN THE SHOW AND TELL AREA BECAUSE I WAS GOING TO BRING A PIECE OF A BRANCH THAT HAD DAMAGE ON IT FROM MY OWN YARD, THE FALL WEB WORM. AND JUST AS I WENT TO LEAVE, IT WAS BEAUTIFULLY RAINING BUCKETS OF WATER. AND I KNEW EVEN IF I GOT OUT THERE IN THE RAIN AND CLIPPED IT, IT WOULD COLLAPSE WHEN IT — GETTING WET AND SOGGY AND SO ON. THAT WAS A REAL GOOD EXCUSE FOR NOT GETTING WET. BUT AT ANY RATE, THIS IS FALL WEB WORM IS WHAT IT IS. AND FALL WEB WORM HAS A VERY WIDE HOST RANG ON DECIDUOUS TREES, PARTICULARLY FOREST TYPE TREES. NOT EVERGREENS AT ALL. YOUR ARBORVITAE WILL NOT HAVE A PROBLEM. THERE IS A WOORM THAT WILL ATTACH TO ARBOR VITAE BUT NOT NEARLY AS SIGNIFICANT LOOKING. ESSENTIALLY, APPLES, CRAB APPLES, MAPLES, OAKS, BIRCHES, WILLOWS, ARE JUST A PARTIAL LIST OF RED BUDS, A PARTIAL LIST OF WHAT FALL WEB WORM WILL GET ON. AND IF YOU LIVE ESSENTIALLY SOUTH OF THE LINE THROUGH LINCOLN, ILLINOIS, JUST A LITTLE BIT NORTH OF SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS, YOU’LL GET TWO GENERATIONS OF FALL WEB WORM A YEAR. SO YOU’LL HAVE HAVE AN EARLY SUMMER, LATE SPRING WEB WORM AS WELL. AND NORTH OF THAT LINE IT’S ONLY ONE GENERATION PER YEAR. GENERALLY THEY DON’T CAUSE ANY REAL SERIOUS DAMAGE TO THE TREE. THE TREE WILL RELIEF THOSE AREAS. YOU CAN CUT THEM OUT IF YOU WANT. IF YOU — IF YOU SPRAY FOR THEM AND THE BTK, THE BACILIS, THE BACTERIAL TOXIN, INSECTICIDE THAT HAS LITTLE EFFECT ON ANYTHING OTHER THAN CATERPILLARS, WILL — WILL WORK. BUT YOU NEED TO MAKE SURE YOU GET INSIDE THE SILK TENT AND BREAK IT UP TO GET TO WHERE THE CATERPILLARS ARE. BUT MANY TIMES AS YOU MIGHT GUESS FROM THE INFESTATION THAT’S ON ONE OF MY OWN TREES, IT’S BEEN THERE FOR THREE WEEKS AND I’VE JUST BEEN WATCHING IT. SO IT’S REALLY NOT GOING TO CAUSE ANY REAL SERIOUS DAMAGE TO THE TREE. AND THE TREE SURVIVES IT WELL. AND — NO, IT’S NOT GOING TO SPREAD TO YOUR ARBOR VITAE. >> THANK YOU. DIANE, WE’RE GOING TO GET TO YOU IN A SECOND. WE’RE GOING TO LET KAY DO HER LAST SHOW AND TELL WITH SOMETHING I’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE. TELL US WHAT YOU GOT. >> THIS IS A CUCUMBER AND IT’S CALLED DRAGONS EGG. I HAVE GROWN IT BEFORE. AND I LOVE IT. IT’S REALLY GOOD TASTING CUCUMBER. AND THE PLANTS JUST — OR THESE — FORGET — PRODUCE AND PRODUCE AND PRODUCE. I’VE GOT BAGS OF THESE CUCUMBERS EVERYWHERE IN MY KITCHEN. >> BUT THEY’RE VERY — I WAS GOING TO ASK WHAT THE FLAVOR WAS LIKE >> VERY GOOD TO EAT. JUST A REGULAR CUCUMBER, BUT THEY’RE KIND OF SWEET AND THEY HOLD WELL ON THE VINE. YOU KNOW, THEY DON’T GET — LOSE THEIR FLAVOR LIKE SOME CUCUMBERS DO OR GET TOO BIG. AND SO I — I REALLY LIKE THESE. AND I USE THESE FOR PICKLES AND — >> DO YOU EVER CONSIDER THEY GET DRY, I GREW A LIGHT SKINNED ONE SUMMER AND IT WAS HORRIBLE. GOT A LITTLE DRY. >> SO FAR THESE HAVE DONE REALLY WELL. SOME OF THEM WILL DO THAT. >> YEAH. THEY WERE STILL BITTER. WE COULDN’T EVEN EAT THE WHOLE — >> NO, THIS ONE TENDS TO BE A LITTLE BIT — IT’S BEEN DRY AND WE’VE BEEN REALLY — REALLY — >> A LITTLE ON THE SWEET SIDE? >> A LITTLE BIT. >> MIGHT PUT IN SOME WATER. >> THEY WOULD BE GREAT IN CUCUMBER WATER. >> ALL RIGHT. THANK YOU. NOW I’M OFFICIALLY INTERESTED. DRAGON’S EGG. OKAY. THANKS SO MUCH. >> HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO HATCH? >> I DON’T KNOW. I HAVEN’T — [LAUGHING] >> YEAH. ALL RIGHT. DIANE. SORRY IT TOOK US SO LONG, DIANE. SHE HAS A QUESTION ABOUT THAT PESKY CREEPING CHARLIE. DIANE, ARE YOU THERE? >> YES. >> GO AHEAD. >> I’VE MOVED TO THIS PROPERTY ABOUT A YEAR AGO, AND I’VE GOT CREEPING CHARLIE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE ENTIRE YARD. I’M TRYING TO GET RID OF IT. I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY HOW TO DO THIS. I DO HAVE A LOT OF TREES AND VEGETATION AROUND, ORNAMENTAL GRASSES, HOSTAS, ALSO, BIRDS, RABBITS AND SQUIRRELS. I WANT TO GET RID OF IT AND WORK ON THICKENING UP A GOOD LUSH LAWN. HOW DO I DO THIS? WHAT WILL GET RID OF THIS. >> WHO WANTS TO TELL HER THE BAD NEWS? >> SOUNDS LIKE YOU HAVE AN AWFUL LOT OF SHADE AND THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE A BUMPER CROP OF CREEPING CHARLIE. I WOULD KIND OF RECOMMEND THAT YOU LEARN TO LIKE IT A LITTLE BIT. [LAUGHING] >> IT’S A REALLY TOUGH WEED. ONE OF THE TOUGHEST WEEDS TO CONTROL. AND MY DAD ENDED UP USING A DETACHING RAKE OVER AN ENTIRE SUMMER AND RACHED IT OUT BY HAND. AND AFTER YEARS OF TRYING ALL SORTS OF THINGS AND COMBINATIONS OF THINGS THAT I TOLD HIM MIGHT NOT BE SAFE. >> GUYS ARE GOING TO DO THAT. >> CAN’T DO THAT. IF ANYONE ELSE HAS — >> IT’S DIFFERENT. IT’S TOUGH. I USE IT AS A GROUND COVER. [LAUGHING] >> ONE OF THE REASONS IT WAS BROUGHT HERE. ALSO MEDICINAL PLANT. AND A MEMBER OF THE MINT FAMILY. >> IF YOU TRY TO PULL IT, YOU HAVE TO GET EVERY LITTLE BIT OF ROOT OUT. AND THAT’S IMPOSSIBLE. >> YEAH. I HAD ONE — BY MOWING HIGH. AND I HAVE A MOWER SET ABOUT AS HIGH AS IT WILL GO. AND — AND WHERE IT’S UNDERNEATH THE SHADE, SAY MY APPLE TREES, RIGHT DOWN TO THE DRIP LINE ALL CREEPING CHARLIE. SHADED ENOUGH, DOESN’T GROW TALL AND DOESN’T DO ANY BIT. IF YOU CATCH A LITTLE BIT YOU GET A BEAUTIFUL ODOR IN THE AIR. WORD GETS OUT WHERE IT GETS PLENTY OF SUN, I’M BLESSED WITH VERY GOOD SOIL, SO IT JUST GROWS UP AND — AND YOU CAN FIND CREEPING CHARLIE THERE BUT YOU GOT TO HUNT HARD AROUND THE GLASS. I LOST MY DEN LINE THE SAME WAY. MOW HIGH. AND THEY SHADED OUT. IF YOU’VE GOT A LOT OF TREES IN YOUR YARD, JENNIFER’S SUGGESTION OF LEARN TO LOVE IT, BECAUSE YOU PROBABLY WON’T BE ABLE TO GET RID OF IT IS NOT A BAD IDEA. BECAUSE IF YOU DO GET RID OF IT, YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE BARE SOIL OR JUST SPINDLY GRASS DUE TO THE SHADE AND IT WILL COME BACK IN, AND BELIEVE ME, SHADE BEATS HOT SUN WITH NICE GRASS ANY DAY OF THE WEEK IN MY OPINION. >> IS THAT ONE OF THE ONES THAT HAS A VERY, VERY DEEP ROOT? >> NO. YOU GRAB AHOLD OF IT, IT COMES OUT EASILY. >> OKAY. I COULDN’T REMEMBER WHICH ONE OF THE TROUBLESOME WEEDS HAS A VERY, VERY DEEP ROOT. THAT’S GOING TO BUG ME NOW. I WILL HAVE TO GO THROUGH THE ARCHIVES. [LAUGHING] >> SO WE’VE GOT ABOUT A MINUTE OR SO LEFT. 30 SECONDS LEFT. WHAT’S GROWING IN YOUR GARDEN? WHILE WE’RE JUST WASTING TIME? WHAT ARE YOU GUYS GROWING? >> CUCUMBERS AND TOMATOES. [LAUGHING] >> MY FIRST — I’M WAITING FOR MY FIRST RED TOMATO, GIANT TOMATOES. >> NICE. PHIL, YOU GOT — >> WE JUST FINISHED HAVING ROASTED EARS, OUR SWEET CORN CAME IN. I’M GOING TO PICK MY TOMATOES THIS WEEK OR NEXT WEEK. AND THE WATER LILIES IN OUR GARDEN ARE BLOOMING BEAUTIFULLY. >> ALL RIGHT. THAT’S ALL THE TIME WE’VE GOT FOR TONIGHT. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR WATCHING

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