Pediatric Medication Calculations – 4 Step Method Made EASY



so in this video we're going to be discussing pediatric medication calculations so what's the big deal if you already know how to do adult medication calculations how come my pediatric patients are done differently well it basically comes down to the fact that there's much smaller margin of error for for pediatric patients and there's also a much greater variety of different sizes of pediatric patients like physical sizes so like you can have as I compare one-year-old to an eight-year-old like their they're physically much different and it's going to be require much different amount of medication in order to treat whatever they have going on so this video we're also going to discuss some things to remember we're going to discuss the four steps you need to remember and then we're going to run through a couple of practice questions so some things to remember most medication most medications for pediatric lines are done by weight if you are done by surface area so as opposed to an adult where it will just say oh give you need 325 milligrams tile or whatever it will give you give a certain amount per a certain unit of weight per day and this is going to make more sense when we go into the example questions and another very important thing that you have to remember is that there are two point two pounds in a kilogram that you're going to need to remember that because you're going to be converting from pounds to kilograms quite frequently so this is the four step method at the first step is always you have to convert pounds to kilograms because all orders are written in terms of kilograms and if you're if the question gives you a weight in pounds you're just going to have to convert to kilograms immediately second step is to calculate the dose in milligrams which we're going to do in the practice questions then sometimes doses are as you as you just like adults bi d TI d and you're going to divide the total amount that child gets by how by the frequency this is going to make more sense when we could do the practice questions and then we're going to calculate just do a basic medication calculation as to how many milliliters or tablets the the patient is actually going to be to get so let's take a look at the first practice question one point five-year-old child is prescribed in amoxicillin suspension the dose is prescribed as the sauce prescribed as 40 milligrams per kilogram per day so this is what the doctors prescribed by the other prescribed 40 milligrams is prescribed 40 milligrams per kilogram per day so that's important to take note of divided into equal vit doses so b.i.g doses so it's going to be two doses in a day the suspension is available in 400 milligrams per 5 milliliter suspension that's going to be important as well what is the dose in milliliters this is basically what the question is asking for and then it gives you this question gives you the child's weight at the very end so it's going to be 22 pounds so step one is to convert from pounds to kilograms so here here's the most important information for this question how do we do that we add two by Twenty twenty two by two point two because remember that there's 2.2 pounds in a kilogram so now we know the child weighs ten kilograms very easy step yeah okay moving on to the second step calculate the dose in milligrams so let's take a look at the question as you can see here the doctor is prescribed 40 milligrams per kilogram per day so how we calculate the dose is we multiply 10 because the child weighs 10 kilograms as you can see here we did that in part 1 so we're going to do 10 multiplied by the 40 milligrams 4 kilograms per day so these are going to cross out and you're going to be left with 400 milligrams per day and this is in the second step so now we're on to the third step and we've already calculated how much the patient is getting per day but now we have to calculate how much the patient is getting per dose and as you can see in this question the dose is divided into B ID equal Vig doses so what does the ID mean the ID means twice a day so what we're going to do is we're going to do 400 divided by 2 and that's going to give us 200 milligrams per dose so this step is now just a simple medication calculation question just as you would do for an adult I have a full video dedicated to this step and it's pretty much a prerequisite for us to learn adult calculations before you move on to pediatric clients so now let's move forward with this step so now we know that each dose so there's going to be two doses and a each dose is going to be 200 milligrams here's the formula for how to calculate a dose it's taken directly from the video I'm going to put a covered up in the in the somewhere around here it will pop up click on it if you don't understand this step it'll it will it will help make more sense so we take the desired dose which is what we want 200 milligrams and we're going to divide it by the amount on hand the amount on hand is 400 milligrams because the suspension is available in 400 milligrams per 5 milliliters and we're going to multiply it by the vehicle and what is the vehicle in this case it's not tablets but it's actually a liquid and a liquid that comes in 5 milliliter unit so we're going to multiply it by 5 solve this math equation and that's going to give us our answer 2.5 milliliters one thing I want to note is that the fact this 400 has nothing to do with this like there's no correlation it just happens to be the same same number this is 400 milligrams per day as a dose but this is the available suspension so if you're just barely paying attention here I don't want you matching up the numbers and just saying oh this goes here this goes there they're actually completely unrelated in numbers they just happen to be the same so question 2 I'm going to give you a second to pause the video and try this question for yourself ok so now we're going to run through this question but we're going to run through a little bit faster so convert from pounds to kilograms where is the child's weight the child weighs 18 kilograms oh okay so this question already gives us the child's weight in kilograms so we're not going to calculate the child's weight in kilograms because already done for us I wouldn't consider this skipping the step but I would consider this that the step is already done for us step 2 calculate the dose in milligrams so we're going to take the child wait 18 kilograms and we're going to multiply it by the dose required so the dose is written as this 100 milligrams per kilogram per day so we're going to do 18 multiplied by this obviously the kilograms are going to cross out and basically all you're going to do is 18 multiply the hundreds and that's going that's going to give you 1,800 milligrams per day so we know how much the overall dose is going to be in milligrams step three divide the overall dose by the frequency well let's take a look at the frequency so 100 milligrams per day given one's daily through an IV throw an IV as has no real relevance to this question but it says it's given once a day but if it's 1,800 milligrams given once a day if this step is already done for us as well because all we would be doing is dividing by one so it's still going to be 1,800 milligrams but now we can scratch this off and put dose and then for example if it was B ID that's two doses so we divide by 2 tid 3 doses divided by 3 and then this step would be complete in this case it's only once a day so it's divided by 1 and other words leave the same check and that was just a simple medication calculation question just as you would do for an adult so calculate the dose in milliliters basically and this is this is basically what we just discussed in step 3 800 milligrams a day is equal to 1800 milligrams per dose so now I'm calculate just as we would for an adult so we have our desired dose which is 1,800 milligrams this is how much we want our on hand is let's take a look at the question here are on hand is 40 milligrams per milliliter so we take our on hand and put it at the bottom here that's it that's just how the formula goes again I have a video dedicated specific on the step because the same it's the same as for adults and then it's for concentration of 40 milligrams per milliliter so in this situation is going to be multiplied by one milliliter we solve this math equation very simple forty five milliliters is our final answer so that's all if you have any questions please feel free to comment below I'm usually pretty good at getting back to people if I think I'm like doing a dosage by surface area video that should be coming up soon and I'll subscribe subscribe for new videos every week

16 comments

  1. Your video is the most helpful one I have found on pediatric dosage calculation for nursing school. Thank you SO much for breaking it down like this!

  2. Im a new PA at a very busy Pharmacy and this is one of my worst nightmare, getting paediatric suspensions. For some reason, I get all panicky when people drop them off and my brain just blocks everything, after watching this video, I’m not scared anymore. Thank you.

  3. i have a question, baby weight 10 kg, amoxacilin 40mg/kg/day into equal tid dose.the suspension is available in a 125mg/5ml suspension. how many dose ml per time

  4. I just wanna tell you that this is awesome I go to a cuny NYC school and my professor is horrible

  5. hi, i have a question , how you do the math for amoxicillin with clavulanic acid ? because you have two dosis in mg , one for the amoxicillin and other for the clavulanic acid, please help !!

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